Patient receiving assistance from an OT

An evolving NHS

The last 70 years have seen remarkable strides in the delivery of healthcare. Throughout its lifetime, the NHS has continued to evolve, responding to the ever changing needs of the population.

In 1948 there were a little over 300,000 people living in Fife. That number has grown to roughly 370,000 in 2018. People are also living longer lives - in 1948 10,000 Fifers were aged 75 or over, today that number has risen to 32,000. Fewer than 250 people aged 90 or over lived in Fife 70 years ago, today that number is 3000.

 

 

 

Patient with Community Nurses

More people are also experiencing multiple health conditions and living with chronic and complex conditions.

 

 

 

Since 1948 changing demographics has had a large impact on the demand for NHS services and also changed how we deliver them.

Today, we know that preventing ill health and early intervention helps improve outcomes and that utilising new technology can bring real benefits to patients and clinicians.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Member of staff visiting a patient at home

Supporting people to remain in their home or in a homely setting so that they are thriving, not just surviving, is a key aim for NHS Fife.  By helping people achieve their personal outcomes for how they want to live their lives and building partnerships with patients, families and with wider community, NHS Fife is delivering more integrated services with other agencies.

Integrating Health and Social Care has been an important step forward in taking this approach further.  The over-arching aim is to ensure people get the right care, in the right place, at the right time so they can realise their aspirations to live long and meaningful lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Frances Elliot on the progress of the NHS

We've come a long, long way over the last 70 years

Constant progress over 7 decades means people in Fife are:

  • Living longer
  • receiving more effective treatment
  • Managing what used to be life ending diagnoses as chronic conditions

Medical Director, Dr Frances Elliot, outlines some of the key changes.

 

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