The role of the Wheelchair and Seating Service is to satisfy, on an ongoing basis, the needs of the wheelchair user and any seating requirements for those who cannot sit comfortably, safely and/or appropriately within standard wheelchair seats.

The service will respond to referrals as rapidly as possible, seeing patients in the order of clinical priority, to assess their wheelchair and seating requirements. The service is also responsible for repairing equipment as quickly as is reasonably possible and ensuring that whenever equipment needs to be removed for repair that, if possible, alternative arrangements are made to satisfy the patient’s requirements.

The  types of equipment we can offer are:

Buggies – usually for young children who are unable to walk. Buggies are usually provided for children aged 3 and over. For children with postural support needs, there are a number of models available which can provide different amounts of support.

Wheelchairs – can be self-propelled or attendant-propelled and are available in a wide range of sizes. Some are available with running brakes to assist carers.

Energy-efficient wheelchairs – for users who propel themselves for a significant part of the day and who can control the stability of the wheelchair, these wheelchairs offer a more efficient means of mobility than the standard wheelchair.

Electrically powered wheelchairs – available in both indoor-only and indoor/outdoor models for users who are unable to propel themselves and unable to walk who can safely control a powered chair. Assessment for this type of equipment will usually involve a test of driving ability. Copies of nationally-agreed eligibility guidelines are available from the clinical staff.

Wheelchair seating systems – these are provided for users who need need extra postural support in their wheelchair. There are a number of different types and you will be assessed to find the best one to suit your needs.

For short term wheelchair loan please contact the British Red Cross who run this service.


Referral routes

A referral needs to be submitted either through the patient’s GP, a hospital consultant, an occupational therapist, physiotherapist or other NHS professional involved in the patient’s care or who are knowledgeable about the patient’s therapeutic, postural and mobility goals.

Established users of the service can contact the service directly although it is often preferably to do so via a health professional (such as a community therapist).